Walking the talk during National Volunteer Week

June 28, 2016 benevity

 

By Miranda Ingram, Ethical Performance Best Practice Editorial Team

This post was originally written by Best Practice, a publication of Ethical Performance, a 3BL Media LLC company


Having talked the talk, this year Benevity decided to walk the talk too, showing how the company not only enables employee engagement programs through its platform but also leads the way in spearheading its own volunteer program.

During this year’s National Volunteer Week in April, more than half the company’s own staffthree times the average year on year participation ratevolunteered for six charities near its Calgary, Toronto and Victoria offices. 

When your people are giving their time and talents to the community, they are also showcasing and developing their skills and your brand.

— Bryan de Lottinville, Founder & CEO, Benevity

Putting its own software to the test, the company created a grassroots group of “Goodness Catalysts” to rally employee passion and participation, helping to connect fellow colleagues with causes they care about. They outreached to 50-60 charities to get opportunities organized and used Benevity’s Spark tool to set them up, manage signup and track participation.

Benevity “Do Gooder” t-shirt

The company launched a robust internal communications plan to promote the initiative, coordinated flexible volunteer opportunities and provided paid time off for hands-on giving. Benevity “Do Gooder” t-shirts contributed to a sense of team sprit and generous incentives, such as $20 per hour of community service that employees could give to the charity of their choice, helped swell the numbers of volunteers to 113, 51% percent of staff compared to the average 16% of most companies. Their clients kept pace as well, with a 50% rise in volunteering activity among corporate users of Benevity’s software platform.

During National Volunteer Week, Benevity’s people made 150 brown bag lunches, 209 hygiene kits and, with founder and CEO Bryan de Lottinville pitching in, collected 211 lbs42 bagsof garbage from the river and green spaces around the Calgary office.
 
“It sounds smarmy, but I teared up a bit watching it,” admits de Lottinville. “It was so powerful to see our team, in our own small way, making a difference that matters. Interacting with the community was fantastic, from the reverence and gratitude we received from recipients and passersby to the engagement when people would grab a bag and help us with the litter clearing, co-owning our initiative.”

“Putting our own technology to work and putting ourselves in the position of our clients enabled us to properly empathize with our clients, their employee users and the charities we benefit. We could see, feel and touch the way an effective volunteer program that promotes grassroots participation infuses a company-wide sense of purpose and pride.”

We’re trying to provide opportunities that inspire our team to be intrinsically engaged in giving and volunteering.

— Nicole Campbell, Principal of Goodness Consulting, Benevity

Benevity surveyed its people about their experiences during the week in order to understand what resonated most. Overwhelmingly, they cited doing good with their peers as the highlight, with comments such as “Loved collaborating with my fellow Benevity-ites to make a difference in our community”, “Getting to meet Benevity-ites on other teams at Benevity” and “Seeing how great the entire team felt after doing good!”

There’s a follow-up effect for the community, says de Lottinville: people who volunteer give five times more than non-volunteers.

Benevity volunteers remove invasive species of plants from Uplands Park in Victoria, BC

Benevity volunteers remove invasive species of plants from Uplands Park in Victoria, BC

When it comes to looking ahead for Benevity, the Principal of the company’s Goodness Consulting Group, Nicole Campbell, says that the overall goal is to build a grassroots-influenced culture of Goodness all year round. 

“We’re trying to provide opportunities that inspire our team to be intrinsically engaged in giving and volunteering,” says Campbell, “And in fact, we want them to feel motivated to take it one step further and drive those initiatives themselves.”

Goodness, combined with technology, has a transformative power that enables businesses to truly engage with their people, unify company culture across a global context, connect corporate values with communities in need and generate measurable business results, believes de Lottinville. 

As a certified B Corporation, Benevity is part of a unique breed of for-profit companies with a social mission who believe that “doing well by doing good” is more than just a catchy tagline. However, de Lottinville’s vision is that one day there will be no need for a separate category of B Corporations because every company will pursue hybrid goals of profit and purpose and giving back to the cause of one’s choice will be “as common and easy as leaving a tip at a restaurant.”

But there is still a way to go. Corporate America still only accounts for 5% of charitable giving, and although 80% of companies with over 5,000 employees have giving and volunteering programs, less than 25% are using software to manage them.

Bryan de Lottinville, Founder & CEO of Benevity, and Andy Howell, COO of Benevity, picking up garbage in Calgary, AB

Bryan de Lottinville, Founder & CEO of Benevity, and Andy Howell, COO of Benevity, picking up garbage in Calgary, AB

“The main challenge facing this landscape is one of scale,” says de Lottinville. “The larger we become, the more aggregation and automation efficiencies we can achieve. The more corporations who use our platform, the more charities we have on-boarded, the more volunteer hours we can log, the more value we can deliver to all our users. We want to keep improving the social and business returns companies receive from their investments in employee and consumer giving and volunteering. We will continue creating new opportunities towards our long-term goal of transforming corporate giving into corporate engagement.”

Benevity’s workplace giving and volunteering tool, Spark, is proprietary software which ensures simple, secure and easy giving so that user-driven grassroots philanthropy can be part of everyday life. At the same time, charities registered with Benevity—after appropriate vetting and due diligence—can receive their money electronically, also cutting the time and administrative costs of manually dealing with grants, donations and tax receipts. 

Using Spark, employees in any geographical location across a company can find and sign up for causes around the world that mean something to them, making donating and volunteering both easy and impactful. They can also track donations and volunteer hours for corporate matching programs.

We could see, feel and touch the way an effective volunteer program infuses a company-wide sense of purpose and pride.

— Bryan de Lottinville, Founder & CEO, Benevity

The emphasis is on employee engagement. Much-quoted statistics released by Gallup show that 70% of American employees are not engaged in their job, and 25% are actively disengaged. This costs the US economy alone up to $550 billion a year. 

“It’s not a silver bullet to employee engagement but an increasingly relevant component. Having employees actively involved in your corporate social responsibility, volunteering and philanthropy gives them a sense of values and purpose in their work and, if done well, an emotional connection to their employer,” says de Lottinville. “Volunteers are the backbone of charitable efforts, and companies that incent and recognize those efforts find that employees become more engaged, productive and happier in the workplace.”

“The old ways of the CEO writing a few charitable checks once a year doesn’t engage anyone. By creating a different approach, we’ve helped companies understand that their employees want and expect more meaningful ways to be actively involved in giving back. Recognizing this helps them attract, retain and engage today’s diverse and tech-savvy workers by connecting people personally to causes that matter to them.”

Benevity people take a break from creating hygiene kits to pose for a picture during National Volunteer Week

Benevity people take a break from creating hygiene kits to pose for a picture during National Volunteer Week

Using Spark’s reporting features, companies can track employee volunteer hours and promote them. All things being equal, prospective employees and customers will choose a company that actively gives back.

“When your people are giving their time and talents to the community, they are also showcasing and developing their skills and your brand,” says de Lottinville. “Our aim is to lead corporate Goodness away from a handout mentality to an investment opportunity, making employee and customer engagement, rather than fundraising, the goal.”

 

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